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Pets & Vitamin C

Do you own a cat or a dog? If so, then you may be surprised to learn that your pet almost surely needs some extra vitamin C added to its diet -- especially if its an older animal. There are only FOUR animal species out of a million or so, which don't produce (synthesize) their own vitaminC within their bodies. Those four are fruit bats, guinea pigs, human beings, and the other primates (monkeys,apes)

I weigh 140 lbs A goat my size will produce about 13 grams (13,000 mg) of vitamin C every day. That's enough to keep him healthy in most circumstances. But if he's wounded or suffers a massive infection, the goat ----- and virtually all other WILD ANIMALS, can synthesize as much as 100,000 additional milligrams of vitamin C to get him through the crisis.

You and I can't do that. And since few people take 13 grams of vitamin C each day, we get sick in staggering numbers. It breaks my heart to think of how many vit C-depleted human beings are spending most of their LIVES trying to cope with chronic diseases, that are EASILY cured by the proper daily dosage of vitamin C.
And the same is true of countless dogs and cats. For unfortunately, our domestic pets produce MUCH LESS vitamin C in their bodies than wild animals.

Dr. Thomas Levy, in his book, VITAMIN C, INFECTIOUS DISEASES, & TOXINS, says, "All wild animals tested had a four-fold GREATER rate of vitamin C production, compared to dogs or cats...so the pets are more easily stressed into a state of vitamin C deficiency." This becomes a big problem as cats and dogs get older. And when you factor in the truly awful food that so many pets are fed, it's no wonder that vets are staying busy, treating their four-footed patients for the same diseases that afflict their owners.

This becomes a big problem as cats and dogs get older. And when you factor in the truly awful food that so many pets are fed, it's no wonder that vets are staying busy, treating their four-footed patients for the same diseases that afflict their owners. Doctor Levy explains it like this: "Dogs and cats are generally healthier than people; but their limited vitamin C-synthesizing abiity is eventually overwhelmed as they grow older and face greater, cumulative, toxic stresses, resulting in more disease than is seen in wild animals. Even the rabbit, which can produce roughly five times as much vitamin C internally, as the dog or cat, can be malnourished to the point of eventually dying from what appears to be a metabolic condition closely akin to scurvey."

Scurvey! There's a word you remember from your high school history class. Scurvey killed tens of thousands of sailors in the 1600's and 1700's. It wasn't until 1753 that a young British doctor, James Lind, made the connection between lack of fresh fruit and scurvey. And then it took another 40 years before the Admiralty ordered the crews of seagoing ships to eat lemons and limes with every meal. Scurvey was eradicated. It was the vitamin C in those citrus fruits that saved so many lives.

So if you have a pet -- especially one that's not doing well -- I strongly suggest you add powdered vitamin C crystals to its food. How much? Well, if a 140 lb goat produces 13 grams of vitamin C daily, then a 14 lb dog would need 1.3 grams (1300 mg) of vitamin C as a maintenance dose. If he's sick, then he will need more. As to what form of vitamin C, my choice would be sodium ascorbate crystals. They're non-acidic, so they won't give your pet (or you) acidosis. I don't have any pets, but I think it would be easy to mix the powdery, white crystals into its food.

Blessings,

Owen