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Broccoli Sprouts & Cancer

If you're going to eat just one vegetable to help prevent cancer, I suggest you choose broccoli sprouts.

I've been eating home-grown broccoli sprouts for more than 15 years. Yes, I like the taste of them. The sprouts are MUCH tastier than the mature broccoli plants. And, yes, they're very easy to grow right in your living room. As I type, there's a round tray of broccoli sprouts growing by the window.

But the main reason I eat broccoli sprouts has nothing to do with taste or ease of growing. It's because broccoli sprouts, in the words of Steve Meyerowitz, the Sproutman, "possess dramatic cancer-preventative properties."

Broccoli and all its kissing cousins -- cabbage, bok choy, and Brussels sprouts -- contain a number of phytochemicals that our immune systems use to fight off carcinogens. Many of you know that.

What you may not know is that broccoli sprouts contain 20 to 50 times MORE of the immune-enhancers than the average adult broccoli plant.

Here's what Dr. John Talalay of Johns Hopkins University, had to say about a 1997 study of sulforaphane, a compound that is the body's strongest natural inducer of enzymes which destroy carcinogens:

"In animals and human cells, we have demonstated, unequivocably, that this compound (suforaphane) can substantially reduce the incidence, rate of development, and size of tumors."

Again, broccoli sprouts have 20 to 50 times the amount of this critically needed compound.

Broccoli also contains Indole-3-Carbinol, which causes estrogen to break down into a harmless metabolite, rather than the form linked to Breast Cancer . This is wonderful news for women, because many cancers that appear in female reproductive organs, are related to too much estrogen.

You can buy Indole-3-Carbinol as a supplement. Or you can opt to grow your own, easily and inexpensively, like I do.

Here's a memorable quote from The Sproutman: "In 3 days, you can raise a crop of sprouts that contains as much sulforaphane, as an acre of broccoli would yield in a year."

So I hope some of you will consider adding broccol sprouts to your eating-regimen. Many big supermarket chains now sell broccoli sprouts in their produce sections. If not, you can ask the produce manager to order them for you.

But growing your own is the way to go. You KNOW they're clean and pure, because they grew on your porch or patio -- or even in your living room .

I wrote a long explanation of my simple and inexpensive method of growing perfect sprouts, in the healing articles. Check it out if you think you might like to grow your own sprouts.

Blessings,

Owen